Pros and Cons of Drinking Alcohol

1305 Words Jul 7th, 2018 6 Pages
Alcohol abuse is the most common problem, nowadays. In fact, majority of people drink alcohol repeatedly to the point where they have difficulty to stop. Statistics show that, as much as, “40% of college students report drinking five or more drinks in one episode” (Walters & Baer, 2006). Alcohol has become more popular over the years as advertisements, simultaneously with commercials of it, filled the media. It also is easily accessible and cheap in comparison to other psychoactive substances. On the other hand, alcohol safety awareness programs are barely noticeable. My research will present how alcohol and its abuse gets into people’s lives and how it influences their physical and mental health, as well as, social existence. Let’s ask …show more content…
Although society likes to name alcoholism a disease, in fact, it is only a strong behavioral problem. A research done by Elvin Morton Jellinek, described later in his book, got him to conclude that alcoholism was biologically induced. Not only I disagree with his thesis, but I also think his beliefs were simply naive. Trying to define a disease, we should think of a genetic imbalance that no one is able to refuse. On the other hand, an addiction is a choice of a way of dealing with emotions. Certainly, we are not able to rewrite genetic code, but we can manage our own emotions and actions. Nevertheless, no matter how an alcohol addiction originates, it still progresses in the same pattern. An adventure with alcohol always begins with, seemingly harmless, social drinking, which is referred to, by professionals, as phase 1. People are trying to have a good time as often as possible, and almost every time, liquors are present. No one is then considering frequency of filling their body-cells with damaging substance. Let’s, now, take a look at a table presented by Howard C. Becker in one of his publications for NIAAA.

Figure 1. Schematic illustration of how problem drinking can lead to the development of dependence, repeated withdrawal experiences, and enhanced vulnerability to relapse.

The graph shows, that it takes as little as one step to start harming a human organism, and about two steps to get stuck inside
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