Protestant Reformation

1706 Words Jun 18th, 2014 7 Pages
PAPER 1
(PROTESTANT REFORMATION)

DOUGLAS HOLLOWAY
STUDENT ID# 23766838

CHHI 302_DO5_201340
FALL 2013

DR. KEITH GOAD
LIBERTY UNIVERSITY
NOVEMBER 05, 2013

As a result of increased corruption in the Catholic Church, a significant number of priests in the 16th century tried to transform Christianity back to its previous Biblical basis and simplicity. Initially, priests channeled much of their efforts in reforming the church, but they discovered that it was very challenging, and the only viable solution was to split completely from the Catholic Church. There were four movements as a result of the reformation events. They include the Anglicans, Lutherans, Reformed Tradition (Calvin), and the Anabaptists. Key figures in the
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He continued to preach and write; enabling him to carry on with reformation.
Reformations’ Theological Issues
Luther identified three major principles that were acknowledged by other Protestant factions. According to the theological premises, all Christians are mandated to believe in the Scripture’s primacy. The idea means that the Biblical literal meaning should be favored in contrast to any learned or conventional readings. Christians are also supposed to reject anything not founded in Scripture. Secondly, justification is by faith alone, and Christians through believing will be saved, and not by their good works; as maintained by the Catholic Church. The other premise is the priesthood of the believer. The idea meant that it was not ideal to consider ordained priests as the “true spiritual estate” members. Priesthood was eliminated by Luther in Protestant Churches though some still make use of pastors or ministers to lead.
Apart from the three principals, the Eucharist sacrament was also elucidated by Luther with reference to consubstantiation. Consubstantiation refers to the assurance that Christ is indeed present in the Eucharist celebration. The belief is also similar to the transubstantiation doctrine. However, in the transubstantiation doctrine, it is believed that wine and bread factually change to the blood and body of Jesus Christ during the