Psych

3626 Words Mar 31st, 2015 15 Pages
AP Psychology, Mr. Kujawa Analysis Writing--Stanford Prison Experiment 13 minutes--www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZwfNs1pqG0 29 minutes--www.youtube.com/watch?v=760lwYmpXbchttp
01. Consider the psychological consequences of stripping, delousing, and shaving the heads of prisoners or members of the military. What transformations take place when people go through this experience? 02. What are the effects of living in an environment with no clocks, no view of the outside world, and minimal sensory stimulation? 03. Compare the reactions of the visitors to the reactions of civilians in encounters with the police or other authorities. 04. What factors would lead prisoners to attribute guard brutality to the their disposition or character, rather than
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Foremost among them was a former prisoner who had served nearly seventeen years behind bars. This consultant made us aware of what it was like to be a prisoner. He also introduced us to a number of other ex-convicts and correctional personnel during an earlier Stanford summer school class we co-taught on "The Psychology of Imprisonment." Our prison was constructed by boarding up each end of a corridor in the basement of Stanford's Psychology Department building. That corridor was "The Yard" and was the only outside place where prisoners were allowed to walk, eat, or exercise, except to go to the toilet down the hallway (which prisoners did blindfolded so as not to know the way out of the prison). To create prison cells, we took the doors off some laboratory rooms and replaced them with specially made doors with steel bars and cell numbers.

At one end of the hall was a small opening through which we could videotape and record the events that occurred. On the side of the corridor opposite the cells was a small closet which became "The Hole," or solitary confinement. It was dark and very confining, about two feet wide and two feet deep, but tall enough that a "bad prisoner" could stand up. An intercom system allowed us to secretly bug the cells to monitor what the prisoners discussed, and also to make public announcements to the prisoners.