Psychology

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The Different schools of psychology
Structuralism- the first school of thought headed by Wilhelm Wundt, a German, and later by E.B. Titchener started in 1879 when experimental psychology was gaining more incentive. The structuralists, as they called themselves, thought of psychology as the study of conscious experience. They started components experience. They started that all complex substances could be analyzed through their component elements. They held that elementary mental states such as sensations, images and feelings form the structure of consciousness and are directly observable through introspection by careful empirical observation. They sought to discover the physiological bases of various types of conscious experiences, with
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The gestalt effect is the form-generating capability of our senses, particularly with respect to the visual recognition of figures and whole forms instead of just a collection of simple lines and curves. In psychology, gestaltism is often opposed to structuralism. The phrase "The whole is greater than the sum of the parts" is often used when explaining gestalt theory, though this is a mistranslation of Kurt Koffka 's original phrase, "The whole is other than the sum of the parts".Gestalt theory allows for the breakup of elements from the whole situation into what it really is.
Psychoanalytic theory- refers to the definition of personality organization and the dynamics of personality development that underlie and guide the psychoanalytic and psychodynamic psychotherapy, called psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology. First laid out by Sigmund Freud in the late 19th century, psychoanalytic theory has undergone many refinements since his work. Psychoanalytic theory came to full prominence in the last third of the twentieth century as part of the flow of critical discourse regarding psychological treatments after the 1960s, long after Freud 's death in 1939. Freud had ceased his analysis of the brain and his physiological studies and shifted his focus to the study of the mind and the related psychological attributes making up the mind, and on treatment using free association and the phenomena of transference. His
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