Public Long Term Care Insurance Of Germany, Japan, And The United States

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Introduction The U.S. Census has reported that by 2050, the United States population of Americans aged 65 and over is predicted to be 83.7 million, which is almost double its estimated population of 43.1 million in 2012 (Ortman, Velkoff, & Hogan, 2014). The baby boomer generation is largely responsible for this increase in the population of aging Americans. By 2050, the surviving baby boomers will be over the age of 85 (Ortman, Velkoff, & Hogan, 2014). This projected growth of the older population in the United States will present challenges for the healthcare system. Campbell, Ikegami, and Gibson (2009) provided an analysis of the healthcare systems in Germany, Japan, and the United States in their article ‘Lessons From Public Long-Term Care Insurance in Germany and Japan’ (Campbell, Ikegami, & Gibson, 2009). Germany and Japan reportedly experienced similar growth with their aging populations and took proactive measures to introduce comprehensive long-term healthcare insurance due to inadequacies in funding within their standard universal healthcare system programs (Campbell, Ikegami, & Gibson, 2009). Germany and Japan have based their healthcare systems on the Bismarck model which was founded by Otto von Bismarck who introduced it to Germany nearly 125 years ago (Wallace, 2013). Bismarck viewed the concept of universal health insurance as an effective strategy in his scheme for German unification. This model utilizes an insurance system which is usually funded jointly by

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