Public Schools Are the Problem, Private Schools are the Solution

1079 Words 5 Pages
Now more than ever parents in the United States have become very disgruntled with their children’s education. The main reason behind this massive dissatisfaction is that public schools are not living up to parent’s expectations. The standards which the public schools that today’s parents, and their parents, attended are quiet different from the ones their children are now attending. It is widely felt that public schools are not performing their basic civil duties. With this, parents are now taking their children’s education and future into their own hands, and doing so quite efficiently. Many parents are turning to alternative means of educating to school their children. One option is home schooling. Home schooling is simply the …show more content…
In his article Gatto writes:" The children are numbered so that if any get away they can be returned to the right class. Over the years the variety of ways children are numbered by schools has increased dramatically, until it is hard to see the human being plainly under the weight of numbers they carry" (168). Since student are taught lessons based on an academic calendar year, they are expected to be able to complete specific tasks by the end of that year. When students fail to meet these expectations they are still allow moving to the next grade with no understanding what they are missing. Teachers in the public school systems are teaching our students as though they are on an assembly line. To be fair, teachers for public schools have their hands tied over what or how to conduct their classes. These same teachers have to report to a political game at their school and government rules. For example, if a child is not ready to go on to the next class, his teacher would have to go thought administration discussions, revaluation, and decisions. Gatto says:" Indeed, the lesson of the bells is that no work is worth finishing, so why care too deeply about anything?" (169). In contrast, students from private schools are seldom needed to be help back since those schools have smaller class, often fifteen to seventeen students per class which in turn allow teachers to work on one-to-one, Jean Anyon writes…