Punishment For Performing An Act

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This case describes several instances in which a student received punishment for performing an act that could have potentially been harmful to those around them. In the scenarios mentioned, most of the actors are young kids. For instance, one 10-year-old girl in particular was arrested for cutting her food during lunch with a knife she brought from home. Another six-year old boy was charged with sexual harassment for running outside naked from his bath to ask the school bus driver to wait. These harsh sentences are a result of Zero-Tolerance policies. According to the case, “’Zero Tolerance’ means that no second chance no evaluating of the situation, and no weighing of consequences be given to the act” (Burnor 141). Zero Tolerance polices…show more content…
Some examples of this include the Pine Middle School shooting in 2006 where the perpetrator was a 14-year old boy and the Virginia Tech shooting in 2007. Due to the increase in school violence, drug abuse, and bullying, administrators are working to get rid of behavior that could potentially be perceived as a threat. In their eyes implementing this policy would be a means of protecting the students and teachers. Some schools are going to the extent of introducing metal detectors at the entrances of the school, security checks, and lockdowns in search for drugs hidden in lockers. Ultimately, school districts believe that if all these changes reduce the risk of one shooting, then the system is worth applying. On the other hand, those that oppose the Zero-Tolerance policy speculate whether the policy is really helping these children or traumatizing them. There are no statistics gathered that prove this policy is actually protecting students. The American Bar Association claims that in the process of incorporating zero-tolerance they are actually harming children and their families. As you can see, the debate over whether to employ a Zero-Tolerance policy in the case arises from the conflicting perspectives between the school administrators and students. For this particular case, I will be arguing that implementation of the Zero-Tolerance policy is not the
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