Questions On Arizona State University

2220 Words9 Pages
Making Arizona Whole Again, One Community at a Time. Submitted by, Ashley Brister November 23rd, 2014 Arizona State University Table of Contents Introduction……………………………………………………………………………..…1 Purpose……..……..…………..……………………………..………………………………..1 Rising Issues………………………………..………………………………………………1 Illegal Immigration……………….……………………….………………………...…1-2 Water Shortages………………………..……………………………..………….……..2-3 Education System.…………………………..……………………..…………………...3-4 Recommendations...…………..…………………………………………………………4 Illegal Immigration.……………….…………………………………………………….4-5 Water Shortages..………………………………….………………………..…….……..5-6 Education System……….…………..………………………….………………………..6-7 Conclusion.…………..……………………………………………………………………7-8…show more content…
Upon research, the statistics below show the impact illegal border crossing has on Arizona. a) Over the past few years, many families have been faced with unemployment, while struggling to find steady work. In 2011 8.7% of Arizonans were officially unemployed, but in the prior year, 9.3% of illegal aliens made up the workforce. That’s 262,587 Arizonans left without jobs and 278,460 illegal aliens with jobs. b) 37% of Arizona’s uninsured population contained is illegal aliens, which was costing Arizona $320 million annually. c) New reports show that tens-of-thousand illegal children will be attending public schools all over Arizona, funded by taxpayers. This will cost Arizona 1.3 billion per year, which weighs down Arizona’s already struggling education system. Water Shortage As rainfall levels continue to drop below normal for Arizona, the drought continues to raise concerns. Although rainfall isn’t necessarily a type of water source, most of the rain Phoenix gets comes from the Colorado River, which in turn is also one of Arizona’s main sources of water and used for Arizona’s water reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell. Here are some concerning facts listed below: a) Lake Mead currently has 45% of its capacity level filled, putting it at 1,085 feet above sea level. Lake Mead is already at the lowest level since the 1930s and if the drought continues, it’s expected to drop to 1,000 feet by 2020. Phoenix currently gets half its
Get Access