Questions On Six Software Development Lessons From The Healthcare.gov 's Failed Launch

2559 WordsApr 1, 201711 Pages
Heusser et al. (2013) Purpose. This article discusses six software development lessons from the Healthcare.gov’s failed launch. Authority. Matthew Heusser is a principal consultant at Excelon Development. He is based in West Michigan and has written over one hundred articles on software development processes. Accuracy. This article is published by CIO from IDG, Serving Chief Information Officers (CIOs), other IT leaders, as well as the ecosystem that surrounds and interacts with them. CIO.com, CIO Executive Programs, CIO Strategic Marketing Services and CIO magazine are produced by CXO Media, an award-winning business unit of IDG Enterprise. References are included. Relevance. This article discusses why Healthcare.gov failed during the…show more content…
An example would be getting ready to go somewhere in a car and discovering that a tire was flat and halting the trip to fix the flat without checking the other tires to see if they are ok or checking to see if the car has gasoline (Heusser et al., 2013, para. 10). 6. Testing is an ongoing process during development and the delivery of the application. The Healthcare.gov project did not have time to complete a regression test phase and user acceptance testing phase because of publicly announced deadlines. You can pass every functional test for the software and still have a product that does not work (Heusser et al., 2013, para. 26). 7. One of the major factors that prevented the system from working was the insistence that everyone had to create a unique identification in the system so that the system could check all the factors that would decide what insurance was available and what subsistence would be accessible to an applicant. If the system had allowed applicants to browse the offerings before creating an application, the system would not have had so many applications in a started pending completion status (Heusser et al., 2013, para. 34). 8. The designed system had to be perfect because so many people were going to sign up for insurance who had never had insurance before otherwise, a taxpayer without insurance would face share tax (penalty) for not having everyone in their household covered (Heusser et al., 2013, para. 34). 9. Security was a key element with the

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