Quests for God, Paths of Revelation in Endo’s Deep River Numada’s Revelation Through Nature

1784 WordsFeb 1, 20098 Pages
Deep River is a short novel through which Shusaku Endo shares the story of a number of Japanese tourists who travel to India in an unknown pursuit of their pilgrimage of grace. Ironically the characters within the novel are non-believers of the Hindu religion, which can be a bit confusing for the reader at first. But as one proceeds through the novel, one will come to realize that the basis of the novel was not to review any particular religion, but to depict the individual journey to God. As stated within the novel, “God has many different faces. I don’t think God exists exclusively in the churches and chapels of Europe…(p.121)”Meaning similar paths will most likely not be taken. However it becomes evident through the reading that it is…show more content…
The seed that Blackie had planted inside Numada in his childhood has slowly sprouted to create an idealized world…(p.77)” Numada’s yearning for a connection with living things can be explained through God. Every living thing is a creation of God, therefore no matter how great a difference appears to be, they have the biggest similarity of all. One can better understand Numada’s yearning through the explanation of Socrates of the difference between form and matter. The forms, which can come in any particular size, shape, etc., are represented by the different living things upon the earth. Matter is represented by the similarity that they are all God’s creatures. Matter, as in God, can not be created nor destroyed, just transferred from one party to the next. Therefore one can conclude the connection that Numada yearns for from other living things is natural because they are all connected through God, although he does not quite realize that yet. During Numada’s first encounter with his hornbill, he is found comparing the bird to Christ. “Numada had taken a liking to Rouault’s paintings, and there was something about the many Pierrot faces he portrayed in his works that resembled this hornbill. He knew that for Rouault clowns were a symbol of Christ.” From the reading, one can conclude that Numada viewed the bird as Jesus, a link to God. He soon fell ill and received a Myna from his wife. After his
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