Railroads and Their Rising Impact on the 19th Century American Society

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The nineteenth century America was a period of history following a number of long lasting wars and also a whole new start to new changes in society. With the collapse of multiple nations that were in contact towards the United States, it paved the way for the growing influence and development for the United States, spurring military imperialism and conflicts, and advances in scientific exploration and technologies. Because of the ideas and resources that were began to spread, develop and flourish in areas of the western hemisphere, the nineteenth century also saw opportunities in construction, communication, and in particular the transportation systems. But as different aspects of society began to improve and that more and more freedom …show more content…
A number of “immigrants with advanced knowledge of English technology arrived in the United States eager to introduce new machines”(From Revolution to Reconstruction), and among them, the development of the steam engine. During the beginning stages of the nineteenth century, railroads only played a minor role in America’s transportation systems. At this time, the more common sources of transporation pertained to turnpike road networks, and canal and waterwat networks which were built depending on the terrain and structure of the land. But the railway network that was created in the preceding years and allowed better efficiency in accordance to time. Raw materials and products could be moved more quickly and cheaper than before (Barnett). It allowed ideas to spread more quicly, from previously what was by horse and by man to communicate among others. The work of railroad pioneers eventually led the nation to be linked together, and eventually became the number one transportation system, and remained for almost another half a century until met by the construction of the interstate highway during the twentieth century. It basically played a huge role in stimulating economic expansion, and was eventually pervasive all throughout the American society. Because of the new developments and resources
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