Rape Culture Definition

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Rape culture and consent are two concepts that are still foreign in our society, but reality is that the two are directly related and that rape culture has reached an all times high in today’s day and age, and the way women are portrayed by the media only fuel the fire surrounding it. Aside from portrayal of women in the media, rape culture encompasses several other problems, but the biggest problem that comes with it—and that has to do with depiction of women in the media—is the fact that sexual consent now lacks a proper definition. The concept of sexual concept is often boiled down to the ideology that if the word “yes” has been said, the sex is automatically consensual, but this ideology does not take into account the fact that consent…show more content…
Among these beliefs lays the belief that rape culture does not exist and that rape does not happen because our society has turned a blind eye on it, but rather because there are bad people. In 2013, the student newspaper editor-in-chief at Wisconsin-Madison University, Katherine Krueger, published a column where she defended her choice of running a letter condoning rape culture in the newspaper. The letter in question was written by junior David Hookstead and maintains that America “doesn’t have a culture of rape any more than it has a culture of murder.” Hookstead argues in his…show more content…
Another example of misunderstanding of consent that Jozowski draws attention to is an incident at the Miami University of Ohio where a flier titled “Top Ten Ways to Get Away with Rape” was plastered in the men’s washroom of a co-ed residence. Among the suggested tips? Raping a woman while she is unconscious by “[putting] drugs in the woman’s drink” (Jozowski 18) so she won’t remember her assailant. The last recommendation on the flier is for men to “rape, rape, rape!!” (Jozowski 18) because it is college and they have to live it up. While the university and the authorities had launched an investigation back in 2012, the outcome hasn’t been revealed and it remains unclear whether or not someone has been apprehended for distributing the flier. In light of these examples, what needs to change on campuses for consent to become a clear concept? There is the suggestion of a “Yes Means Yes” policy by which each party would have to give verbal consent—the only problem with this policy being that a “yes” is expected. With a “Yes Means Yes” policy, “yes” implies consent whereas silence implies “no” and it is unusual for women to verbalize a “no” without giving an explanation, so they mostly give non-verbal cues that men sometimes choose to overlook (Jozowski
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