Rastafari and Vodou Essay

2432 Words Jul 20th, 2006 10 Pages
The first attempt by Christopher Columbus to chart a direct trading route from Spain to India was blocked by land previously unknown to Western Society. Assuming the possibility of sailing due east, rather than around the horn of Africa to reach India, Columbus ran into the West Indies of the Caribbean "discovering" the New World. This accidental initial contact in 1492 would set into motion monumental events in world history. For the next three centuries conquest, slavery, and colonization would create a blending and clashing of Native, European, and African cultures in this area of many islands and coastlines of South America, Central America, and North America. New cultures were created through the mingling of separate cultures due …show more content…
Rastafarians split from organized religion, but hold onto their Christian faith by interpreting the Bible for themselves in new unique ways. "This is what Rastafarian "theology" is about: taking the discourse into intellectual landscapes beyond narrow theological hermeneutics and exegesis, whose methods of argumentation are considered Christian-specific and predetermination in that tradition." (Nettleford 313)
Haiti and Jamaica were both colonized for economic purposes. Like the other Caribbean islands that were initially inhabited by native peoples such as the Taino, they traded hands as one European power after another fought each other claiming territory for their selves. Haiti eventually fell to the French and England took Jamaica. Both islands were used for sugar production and both France and England relied on slave labor for success. The native populations were not a part of the European slave system because they were either wiped out during the initial conquests or were able to emigrate to familiar lands in the Caribbean. France and England capitalized on the existing slave market of western Africa to supply the demand for labor. European exploitation of slaves from Africa increased the slave trade so that, until the trade was abolished in the late nineteenth century, millions of humans were stolen from their homeland and transported across the Atlantic not.
The African…