Raw by Scott Monk, Hard Rock by Etheridge Knight, and Dangerous Minds by John N. Smith

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Raw by Scott Monk, Hard Rock by Etheridge Knight, and Dangerous Minds by John N. Smith Institutions can have positive and negative effects that can alter an individual's perceptions, judgment and values. "Raw" by Scott Monk, "Hard Rock" by Etheridge Knight and "Dangerous Minds" by John N. Smith help communicate an understanding of how such institutions can reform an individual. The novel "Raw" written by Scott Monk, is simple in style but introduces interesting and an acceptable insight to the concept of "the institution and the individual experience". Brett Dalton resembles a highly wrought, reactionary character who challenged or feels confronted by structures of authority or control. Using Brett as the protagonist, Monk opens…show more content…
He implies that the power to change lives within the individual. Further on in the novel, Brett is still of concern and Sam reaches out to try and help. "Don’t shut me out, Brett. I do know the score and that is why I'm worried about you ". This indicates the positive effect of the institution and on the individual. Josh is another character who helps Brett reform. Josh is seen as the rehabilitated teenager who chooses to stay on the farm. He helps Brett realize that his problems are the least of his worries when compared with other troubled teenagers, for example Josh himself. His problems are quite indescribable, he has no parents that desire to care for him, whilst Brett does, and this changes Brett's perspective towards Josh and his life. Monk deliberately outlines the change in Brett through Josh to demonstrate the changing experience and positive effect of the institution on Brett. Scott Monk employs many techniques to convey his ideas of the positive changes Brett incurred from an institution. One of many is the use of contrast, which juxtaposes Brett's life at the beginning and his reformed life at the end. Monk highlights this contrast through the prologue and epilogue. In the prologue, Brett hates anyone who has the authority – he thinks the whole world is against him, whilst in the epilogue Brett had learnt to make friendships, gain trust and respect and learn to accept his own mistakes and responsibilities. Violent

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