Real Courts vs Fictional Courts

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This essay will discuss the differences in the ‘real’ courtroom, versus the ‘fictional’ courtroom, which is the depiction most of us are exposed to. In order to accurately compare the differences between the two different courtrooms, a brief summary of each must be presented. Once each of these is portrayed, an attempt to compare and contrast the two styles and the differences that exist between them can be discussed. Lawyers: better in the abstract than in person? Maybe. Studies indicate that people think less of lawyers after consulting one than they did before. Why? Because real-life lawyers cannot measure up to the models portrayed in popular culture such as movies and television, says David R. Papke, the R. Bruce Townsend…show more content…
Lawyers shouldn 't be acting up in a courtroom, whether it 's in front of a jury or not, the judges made clear. As examples of bad behavior, they cited lawyers jumping up and down in front of them, rolling their eyes while chuckling with each other during proceedings and repeatedly shaking their heads during arguments by opposing counsel. (Miami Review, 2008). "There 's no reason to ever show your emotions at that level in front of a judge," said Valdez, who admonished the lawyer jumping in front of her. The standard becomes particularly important when a jury is involved because of the distraction it can present, they said. St. Eve noted one juror she talked with was upset with how an older male lawyer was treating a younger female colleague at the lawyers ' table. Kennelly said some of his jurors complained recently because attorneys were "demeaning" others with the eye rolling and chuckling. "I cannot stress enough how much juries really do pick up on what the lawyers are doing," St. Eve said. The suggestion extends to treatment of opposing counsel, they said. "You 've got to be a pro when you 're in there, and what a pro does is they wait for their turn and then they talk," Kendall said. (Miami Review, 2008). This statement clearly shows that Hollywood style antics are not, and will not be tolerated in a real courtroom setting. Although courtroom dramas are very popular today, they create a portrayal that is best suited for
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