`` Real Women Have Curves ' : An Individual 's Pursuit Of The American Dream

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In the film, “Real Women Have Curves” portrays the theme that the American Dream is achievable, but greatly hindered to obtain it. Ana Garcia continuously faces obstacles such as not having equal opportunities to partake in extracurricular activities, a quality education institution, and the continuous struggle between her mother 's traditions and the modern world 's definition of a woman. Ultimately, she successfully passed through these hindrances and achieved her goals. The American Dream is the ideal goal every person wants to obtain, but certain obstacles prevent them from continuing to complete their goals. In the article, “Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life”, Lareau discusses on how social status serve as a factor…show more content…
In, "Real Women Have Curves", Ana lived in a working-class family that did not offer the opportunities that the children in the middle class were offered. She had to take multiple bus stops in order to arrive to her high school as well as work a part time job at a fast-food restaurant in order to finance her own needs. These limited opportunities made the American Dream much more difficult to pursue for her. Social class also brings other resources to children besides extracurricular activities. One being a higher quality in education. In the article, “Before a Test, Poverty of Words”, Ginia Bellafante discusses the correlation of class to education. Bellafante interviewed Steven F. Wilson, who states that these children in his institutions were “word deficit” (Bellafante, 34). Meanwhile, Bellafante supports Wilson 's comment with her own previous experience when she witnessed a boy around the age of three who was being immersed into a “continuous receipt of dictation” (Bellafante, 34) by his “affluent, ambitious parent” (Bellafante, 34). This experience also proved accurate as Bellfante 's article comments that “children of professionals were, on average, exposed to approximately 1,500 more words hourly than children growing up in poverty” (Bellfante, 34). Being deficient in vocabulary can affect a child 's ability to attend a top tier educational institution as they will be less prepared for
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