Reconstruction Policy after the Civil War Essay

1176 Words 5 Pages
Post-civil war the torn nation juggles wide ranges of emotions as they attempt to piece together the shattered unity but didn’t know how to go about doing so. President Lincoln had great plans for the reconstruction but was killed before he could put them into action. He was murdered by John Booth at Ford Theater and passed the next morning. Lincoln’s Vice-president, Andrew Johnson, took over and became the new president. Johnson and Congress argued about how to go about the reconstruction and in the end Congress enacted their own laws and amendments that strengthened the federal government. Freedmen weren’t truly free after the Civil war ended, free in name only. Ex-Confederates were less than the Northerners and didn’t get the rights …show more content…
Post-civil war the torn nation juggles wide ranges of emotions as they attempt to piece together the shattered unity but didn’t know how to go about doing so. President Lincoln had great plans for the reconstruction but was killed before he could put them into action. He was murdered by John Booth at Ford Theater and passed the next morning. Lincoln’s Vice-president, Andrew Johnson, took over and became the new president. Johnson and Congress argued about how to go about the reconstruction and in the end Congress enacted their own laws and amendments that strengthened the federal government. Freedmen weren’t truly free after the Civil war ended, free in name only. Ex-Confederates were less than the Northerners and didn’t get the rights they once had as states in a great nation. Southerners were turned away from congress and states rights weren’t bestowed upon them until much later. Their rights came back but the damage was done and left the south feeling very bitter. Reconstruction should be a combination of reunification, integration, and attempting to restore the damage brought upon U.S. citizens during the Civil War. Ex-Confederates, ex-rebels, and fellow countrymen were treated unfairly when returning to the Union. Northerners made no move to welcome the south back in though they were already licking their wounds from their loss. Southerners weren’t allowed back into Congress, when the South sent their representatives they were turned away at the door. Lincoln had