“Reformed Theology and the Southern Baptist Convention: Historical Precedent or Revisionist Heterodoxy

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Liberty University “Reformed Theology and the Southern Baptist Convention: Historical Precedent or Revisionist Heterodoxy A Research Paper Submitted to Dr. Jonathan Yeager in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for The Course CHHI 525 Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary by Jeffery S. Cully Lake Waccamaw, North Carolina July, 2014 Table Of Contents Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………….3 Reformed Baptist Origins……………………………………………………………………...4 Colonial Baptists………………………………………………………………………………5 Charleston Tradition………………………………………………………………………….7 Sandy Creek Tradition………………………………………………………………………..10 Southern Baptist Convention………………………………………………………………..12 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………...15…show more content…
Farther North the Reformed churches in the tradition of Calvinism found strong support among those living in Switzerland, the Netherlands and most especially Scotland with even a sizable minority in France as well. Meanwhile in England, the Anglican tradition had begun under the banner of the Church of England after having separated itself from the Roman Catholic tradition during the 1530’s; a response by Henry VIII to Pope Clement VII’s refusal to annul the kings marriage with Catherine of Aragon. It is from the last of these, during the Elizabethan period, that the rise of English Puritanism can be seen culminating in disillusionment with the reign of James I and finally revolution under Charles I. Originally disgruntled Calvinist elements within the Anglican Church, these radical Protestants known as Puritans would eventually evolve into a loose confederation of Presbyterians, Separatist and Congregationalist who in essence were as much a political movement as a religious one. It was from these first separatist and Congregationalist that the rise of General Baptist under the guidance of John Smyth is seen as well as the eventual planting of the first Baptist church in England in 1611 under the leadership of Thomas Helwys. Definitively Arminian in

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