Remains of Egyptian Kings and Myth by by Robert Morkot Essays

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“Divine of Body: The Remains of Egyptian Kings” was written by Robert Morkot, a lecturer in Archeology at the University of Exeter, and was published in Past and Present in 2010. In this article, Morkot argues that the Egyptian practice of mummification was not related to the western principle of relic-collection and that the remains of rulers weren't worshiped or put on display. Instead, the Egyptian obsession with the preservation of bodies was linked to their view of a complete body being essential as a place for the soul to reside after death. Current mummies are a controversial issue due to how, or if, they should be displayed to the public because the Egyptian Kings wouldn't have wanted to be put on display. The way in which they are…show more content…
“Divine of Body: The Remains of Egyptian Kings” was written by Robert Morkot, a lecturer in Archeology at the University of Exeter, and was published in Past and Present in 2010. In this article, Morkot argues that the Egyptian practice of mummification was not related to the western principle of relic-collection and that the remains of rulers weren't worshiped or put on display. Instead, the Egyptian obsession with the preservation of bodies was linked to their view of a complete body being essential as a place for the soul to reside after death. Current mummies are a controversial issue due to how, or if, they should be displayed to the public because the Egyptian Kings wouldn't have wanted to be put on display. The way in which they are displayed is more in line with the western view of relics than the religious significance with which the Egyptians intended them to be. The lack of this “relic view” of the mummified remains in Egypt is due to their “completeness view,” closely associated with religious practices of the time. Each person was made up of different elements, each having a different purpose, and together making up the essence of that person. Upon preservation, the body became a vessel for the soul, divine (after the incense rite) and non. The body was placed in a tomb, which became the place of rituals for awhile after death. These tombs were robbed many times over the years, but the primary motivation appears to have been the acquisition of valuables and not

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