Reverie by Roy Lichtenstein

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Reverie by Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein was an American artist who was an influential part of the Pop Art movement in the 1960s. Roy Lichtenstein was born in New York in 1923 and he has created some of the most well-known Pop Art paintings and artworks. An example of his artwork is “Reverie”, it is a screen print by Roy Lichtenstein in 1965 in his iconic comic strip art style. “Reverie” by Roy Lichtenstein shows social commentary of mass production through the art movement it’s in, the technique used, the subject matter.

“Reverie” is an example of an artworks that is part of the Pop Art movement. Pop Art developed in the early 1960s as a response to abstract expressionism. It was originally a British movement in the mid 1950s
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“Reverie” was almost imitating the way a machine might print out an image. Lichtenstein’s art style used the style of comic strips which included bright colours, single scenes, dialogue balloons, and Ben Day dots. He depicted a world of prepackaged emotions, which is parallel to the mass produced, prepackaged consumer products that were also main subjects of Pop Art artworks. Lichtenstein has very careful technique when creating his paintings to create the message it conveys. Lichtenstein has very careful technique when creating his paintings. When Lichtenstein works from a photograph or a cartoon, he draws a picture small enough to fit his opaque projector in order to project the picture he drew on his canvas before he paints. Even though when he’s working from other people’s works, he draws the picture to recompose it instead of to just reproduce it. Sometimes he works with more than one cartoon and combines them, either completely copying the style or making it up, depending on the projects and plays around with he drawing until he’s satisfied. He stencils the dots that’s his artworks are known for first for technical reasons, then starts colouring from lightest colours to darkest which are the thick bold outlines. He will keep erasing, redrawing, and re-dotting his artwork until he is satisfied. He tends to make a lot of changes in the process of paining so he uses in Magna colours which is soluble in turpentine so

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