Reverse Integrated Care

1485 Words6 Pages
Introduction Physical health and behavioral health care are typically delivered in separate settings by different providers, often with little collaboration and coordination. This fragmented health care delivery system leads to care deficiencies, specifically for individuals with mental and physical health co-morbidities (Enthoven, 2009). Individuals with mental and substance abuse disorders may die decades earlier than the average person — often from untreated and preventable chronic diseases (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration [SAMSHA], 2017). Evidence indicates that the health care system is improving care delivery for members with co-morbidities through the integration of physical and behavioral health care (Enthoven, 2009).…show more content…
It also reduces emergency room utilization and readmission rates (SAMSHA, 2017). The goal of this literature review is to describe the integration of primary care into a behavioral health setting (reverse integrated care). Specifically, the (a) characteristics of reverse integrated care; (b) benefits of integrated care; (c) challenges of integrated care (d) strategies to increase patient engagement in primary care and educational approaches to increase collaboration among healthcare providers. This review serves to provide a rationale for a study of how educating behavioral health workers on integrated care influences the number of referrals to the Primary Care Providers (PCP) and how educating patients on the benefits of integrated care will increase the number of patients scheduled to see the PCP. While several studies examine the effectiveness of the integrated care, few delve into the effects of staff and patient education. As such, this study shall serve as one of the first to explore how educating patients and medical staffs in a reverse integrated care setting can further…show more content…
Other benefits of reverse integrated care ranges from clinical outcomes through patient -centered care and population-based treatment approaches (Auxier, Farley, & Seifert, 2011) to financial incentives with value-based payment and shared revenue stream (Enthoven, 2009). Achieving these benefits requires changes in the cultural dynamics, workflow, and operational processes. For example, implementing new screening tools, the introduction of warm hands-off, huddles and collaboration between physical and behavioral health teams (Buche et al.,
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