Review of Literature of Indian Banking System After Liberalisation

1699 Words Sep 13th, 2010 7 Pages
TABLE OF CONTENTS

S.NO

CHAPTER
DECLARATION (PARA 12 – B) CERTIFICATE (PARA 12 – C) PREFACE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

PAGE ii iii iv v 1 1 1 2 4 6 11 11 12 13 14 15 15 18 20 21 21 25 26 28 30

1 1.1 1.1.1 1.1.2 1.1.3 1.1.4 1.1.5 1.1.6 1.1.7 1.1.8 1.1.9 1.1.10 1.1.11 1.1.12 1.1.13 1.2 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.3 1.4

INTRODUCTION Importance of Banks in an Economy What Is A Bank? Functions of a Bank Banking Sector in India The Role of Banking in an Economy Role of Banks in the Indian Economy The Role Of Central Bank In Indian Banking System (RBI) Basel Norms and Banking in India Recent Developments In The Indian Banking Industry Government Initiatives Challenges and Opportunities for Players Scenario Planning Of Banking Sector: 2010 Challenges Faced By
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The experiences and advancements taking place in the Hungarian banking industry from a centralized economy to a more liberal, market-oriented structure was studied by Hasan, Iftekhar and Marton, Katherin (2003). In their study, they concluded that flexible approaches to privatization, early recognition initiatives and open trade policies towards foreign banks are the factors responsible for building a relatively stable and efficient banking system.

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The analysis of the merger of two banks in Scandinavia also led renowned author Peter (2003) to believe the same. The analysis explained the changes in reforms, legislative structure, competitive environment, and the challenges and opportunities in merging a smaller and successful bank in a state-owned bank. in this book, the most crucial part was the predicted effects of the merger on the profitability and market position.

Similarly, Kipper et al (2003), presented in his study two diverse sets of data. The authors used a sophisticated model and descriptive statistics to test the validity of two basic premises of the theories on optimal ranges. Rather than supporting the widely accepted assumptions, it was found that people appear not too pay accurately and are different in usage of coins and notes.

When Portugal entered the European Community in 1986, it transformed its repressed banking system into an