Review of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest Essay

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Review of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest

The play The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde definitely proved itself to be “A Trivial Comedy for Serious People.” I saw the play at State University’s State Theatre. The play was long, in a three-act structure, yet it moved along at a good pace. They did a nice job of preparing the audience, there was an interesting lobby display with sketches of each of the costumes with fabric samples and they played music to fit the time period before the show began. The first of Aristotle’s six components of theatre is plot. This play had an intricate and definitely interesting plot. The story begins with Ernest visiting his friend Algernon, or Algy, at his house in town.
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Everyone is a bit surprised by this, since Ernest is supposedly there. Jack, distrustful of Algernon's intentions toward Cecily, orders Algernon to leave by the next train. Algernon and Cecily say their goodbyes, and Cecily confesses she has been deeply in love with "Ernest" for a year and has made entries in her diary detailing the courtship. Algernon, wishing to stay "Ernest" for Cecily's sake, rushes off to the church to be rechristened "Ernest." Gwendolen, Algernon’s cousin, who happens to be engaged to Jack whom she believes to be Ernest, arrives from London looking for Jack/Ernest and is escorted into the garden to meet Cecily. They sit down to afternoon tea and accidentally discover they are both in love with "Ernest Worthing." Jack and Algernon return to the garden, are confronted by their lovers, and admit their true identities. Gwendolen and Cecily, each with her heart set on loving someone by the name of Ernest, retreat indoors together. Gwendolen and Cecily decide to forgive Jack and Algernon their indiscretions and promise to marry them. Lady Bracknell, Gwendolen’s mother, makes a surprise visit in order to retrieve Gwendolen. When she learns of Cecily's great fortune, she gives her consent to Algernon's marriage to Cecily. Jack refuses to give his consent, however, unless he is allowed to wed Gwendolen. Chasuble arrives to rechristen both young men when Miss
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