Richard Crowley : If It Pleases The Court And The Gentlemen Of The Jury

943 Words Nov 15th, 2015 4 Pages
RICHARD CROWLEY: If it pleases the court and the gentlemen of the jury: On November fifth, 1872, a general election for different officers was held. The defendant, Miss Susan B. Anthony, at the time resided in the city of Rochester, in the county of Monroe, Northern District of New York. On the fifth day of November 1872, she voted for a representative in the Congress of the United States, to represent to the 20th Congressional District of the State. At the time of her voting, she was a woman, there is no question of that. The question in this case, in my opinion, will be a question of law over one of fact. I suppose that there will be no question of fact, when all of the evidence is out and it will be for you to decide whether or not the defendant committed the offense of voting for a representative in Congress. There is no question about it and whatever Miss Anthony’s intentions were, she did not have the right to vote. She is guilty of violating a law of the United States. On the fifth of November 1872, she voted whether she believed that she had a right to vote or not. It is not necessary for me, gentlemen, at this stage of the case, to state all of the facts and I will leave that to be shown by the evidence and by the witnesses.

[HENRY SELDEN stands as RICHARD CROWLEY takes his seat and HENRY SELDEN begins his opening statement]

HENRY SELDEN: If it pleases the court and the gentlemen of the jury:
This is a large case, though many might regard it as one of…

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