Rise of Greek Civilization Essay

641 Words Dec 16th, 2011 3 Pages
What were the factors that contributed towards the rise of civilization in Greece? How is it something special in the intellectual world?
Is it true that science and philosophy were born at the same time i.e. in the 6th century B.C.?
What were the reasons for the early development of civilizations (E.g. writing in 4000 B.C.) in Egypt and Mesopotamia? When were the pyramids built?
How did Gods get associated with morality, as in breaching law became impiety? What was the oldest legal code of Hammurabi, the king of Babylon?
What was the Babylonian contribution to the growth of man? How was the Babylonian knowledge inherited by Thales in the 6th century?
Points
Sudden rise of civilization in Greece
Role of Egypt Babylon (both around
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It is evident that this process can be carried too far, as it is, for instance, by the miser. But without going to such extremes, prudence may easily involve the loss of some of the best things in life. The worshipper of Bacchus reacts against prudence. In intoxication, physical or spiritual, he recovers an intensity of feeling which prudence had destroyed; he finds the world full of delight and beauty, and his imagination is suddenly liberated from the prison of every-day preoccupations. The Bacchic ritual produced what was called "enthusiasm," which means, etymologically, having the god enter into the worshipper, who believed that he became one with the god. Much of what is greatest in human achievement involves some element of intoxication, * some sweeping away of prudence by passion. Without the Bacchic element, life would be uninteresting; with it, it is dangerous. Prudence versus passion is a conflict that runs through history. It is not a conflict in which we ought to side wholly with either party. Teaching of Orpheus – transmigration of souls according to Karma (quite similar to the Hindu Karma)
The conventional tradition concerning the Greeks is that they exhibited an admirable serenity, which enabled them to contemplate passion from without, perceiving whatever beauty it exhibited, but themselves calm and