Robert Elbert

1202 Words5 Pages
According to Reel News Daily, on average, there are 57 movies released every month or 684 movies each year. That’s way more movies than the average person watches in a given year. So, how do we decide what movies to go see and what not to see? What’s good and what’s bad? Fortunately, we have critics who watch most of these movies and write reviews to help narrow down what movies to go see and what movies not to see. One of these critics is Robert Ebert. Robert Elbert is a honorable critic to base judgments off of because he does an exceptional job summarizing the plot, stating his personal opinions, and speaking about the actors/director’s roles in the film. Summarizing plot of a film without giving away too many details and spoiling the…show more content…
Modern special effects show *exactly* how imaginary scenes might look; effects then showed how we *thought* about them” (Elbert, Roger). claims Elbert. Talking and discussing visuals that occur in the film is helpful to audiences when reading movie reviews for multiple reasons. First, it shows how seriously the critic takes their jobs. Well respected critics have a good eye for details that like that another person may not have noticed if they do not know what they are talking about. Second, a lot of people are interesting in the graphic and digital part of how films are made and is a large factor on whether or not that take time out of their day to go and see it. Elbert provides aspects in his review that everyone can find what they are looking for, to decide on a film. He is extremely thorough is in the details that he puts in his reviews and has a reputable grasp on what to add in and what should be left…show more content…
There were multiple directors involved in the making the classic, The Wizard of Oz. To be more specific there were four; Richard Thorpe, George Cukor, Victor Fleming, and King Vidor. Elbert elaborated nicely on why there was more main directors in this film that in most others. “Richard Thorpe, the original director, was fired after 12 days. George Cukor filled in for three days, long enough to tell Judy Garland to lose the wig and the makeup, and then Victor Fleming took over. When Fleming went to “Gone with the Wind,” King Vidor did some of the Munchkin sequences, and the Kansas scenes. (Elbert, Roger)” Including this information is very beneficial in a movie review because it means that the critic took the time to do research in the movie. They put in effort to give an honorable and respectable review of the film. They wanted to the audience members to have an honest opinion on how well the movie was and thought about the cast and crew that took part in making the
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