Robin Hood Outlaw

869 Words4 Pages
In mid-14th century Nottingham, under the rule of King Edward II, an outlaw named Robin Hood emerged from Sherwood Forest with his entourage of outlaws he claimed his Merry Men. Robin Hood and his Merry Men have gone down in history as the band of outlaws whom were said to have stolen from the rich and given to the poor, not to mention ridding Nottingham of the malicious Sheriff. Many historians have been questioning the amount of truth behind the story of Robin Hood and his Merry Men that has been passed down from generation to generation for centuries, but no one knows for sure what really happened. There are many theories referring to Robin Hood’s existence, but one in particular seems more plausible than the rest – that the story of Robin Hood is the story of not just one man and his entourage, but a collection of admirable people who helped change society for the greater good.
Robin Hood was believed to be a heroic outlaw in the mid-14th century, who stole from the rich and gave to the poor. But who’s to say that Robin Hood was the only one who did this? What if Robin Hood’s figure was a summary of what the majority of outlaws of this time used to do and what gave them their outlaw title? Robin Hood may indeed have been an outlaw, and in the eyes of the poor people of Nottingham, a hero, but people aren’t always what they first appear. Robin Hood and his Merry Men may have been some of the first people to using lending schemes for their own personal gain, which could
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