Roman Law During The Enlightenment Era

2453 WordsMar 10, 201510 Pages
Roman Law Justice has been misperceived to go hand and hand with rules in which a society must conform to, mostly in due part to the enlightenment era. In the case with the Romans, the laws they established, especially early on, dealing with the spread of Christianity has been interpreted with a sense of disgust for the unfair treatment targeted towards Christians, and later on to those of other faiths. However, I argue that, Roman law, when concerning religion, was used to strengthen the identity of what it meant to be Roman. Furthermore, as Rome, the political institution, was beginning to decay, as an act of acclamation, the formulation of Roman Laws allowed Christianity to be a main means of connection to what it meant to identify as Roman. Utilizing various primary sources, it is evident that faith had been gradually accepted as the dominant form of unity and law, beginning with Emperor Diocletian to Emperor Theodosia, even among emperors, the Catholic faith had shown that all men were under God, and under God they were all Roman. Roman law had first concerned itself with the spread of the Christian faith under the rule of Emperor Diocletian. Becoming the victor of a civil war, Diocletian had acquired the right to rule. Through his reign, it was evident that Diocletian had wanted to enforce his political strength, by imposing various methods to his empire, with varying degrees of success. Reorganizing the state by means of repairing infrastructure, creations of
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