Romantic Literature: The Romantic Period In English Literature

845 Words4 Pages
The Romantic Period in English literature began in the late 1700s. Romanticism focuses on the emotional side of human nature, individualism, and the beauty of the natural world. Romantic literature explores the intense beauty of nature and Romantic poets invest natural events with a divine presence. In nature, the Romantics find inspiration for their poetry, wisdom and happiness. They were living and writing at the time of the Industrial Revolution so the Romantics wanted to remind everyone the importance of nature. Romantic movement was against industrialization and mechanization. The Romantic period included the work of two generations of writers. The chief writers of the first generation were Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Blake. Shelley belonged to the second generation. He was influenced by the work of the writers of the first generation. The Romantics did not actually identify themselves as such. It was later Victorian critics who first used the term to describe the previous…show more content…
Art is an expression of our thoughts, emotions, and desires. It is about sharing the way we experience the world. Beauty is a measure of affect and a measure of emotion. The difference between art and beauty is that art is about who has produced it, beauty depends on who is looking. Samuel Taylor Coleridge is the constant companion of William Wordsworth. When we look at his poem "Lines to a Beautiful Spring in a Village", we see that there are several metaphors in the poem. He says "With one fresh garland of Pierian flowers". There is a mythological reference to the Pierian spring which was considered sacred to the Muses. In the poem we see that the speaker feels restful as he walks with 'slow foot' by the streams and also he calls the happy days of childhood. In addition, William Blake was an English poet, painter and printmaker. His poem "The Lamb" focuses on the deep and complex theme of the nature of
Get Access