Romeo And Juliet Act 3 Scene 3 Essay

1689 Words7 Pages
In Act III, scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet, Friar Laurence informs Romeo that the Prince has decided to punish him with banishment from Verona. Instead of feeling joyful of escaping capital punishment, Romeo mourns over the fact that he could never see Juliet again. While the two discuss the Prince's decision, the Nurse arrives and tells Romeo that Juliet is also heartbroken over Tybalt's death. Guilty of hurting Juliet, Romeo threatens to commit suicide. To stop Romeo, the Friar suggests that he and Juliet should consummate their marriage, and afterwards, they can try to get the Prince's pardon. Comforted, Romeo agrees and prepares to see Juliet. As the director, I will ask the three characters to showcase the difference between the youth and…show more content…
I will ask Friar Laurence to act as a reliable and wise older priest would. He should report the Prince's ruling over Romeo's transgression with happiness, since banishment is truly preferable to death. Later on, he should be able to depict disappointment over Romeo's reaction to banishment, underlining that he is talking down to Romeo who is being extra unreasonable. Likewise, as Romeo continues to argue that he is worse off banished than dead, the Friar will appear impatient with Romeo's lack of appreciation over this "good news" that he brings. Also, the Friar will seem emotionally detached to differentiate himself from the excessively sensitive Romeo. He has to show what it means to be a sensible and calm adult. Nonetheless, as he hears from the Nurse how miserable Juliet is and how Romeo would readily kill himself over causing Juliet's pain, he would look like he wrangled his brains to come up with the best solution possible where people would not die. The Friar would then remain prudent and composed above all the immaturity and emotionality of Romeo. Supporting the Friar’s dismal assessment of Romeo is the Nurse. I will direct her to be the funny character in the scene, her face underlining how ridiculous Romeo appears, bawling like a woman on the floor. She even looks appalled as she asks Rome to stand up and be a man, instead of blubbering on the floor. Still, as the Nurse describes Juliet's misery, she would exude deep concern like a mother would. Her face depicts that if there is anyone who loves Juliet as much as Romeo, it is her for she is similar to a mother who cares only for her child's happiness and nothing
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