Romeo and Juliet - Fate

1990 Words Oct 3rd, 1999 8 Pages
"Two households, both alike in dignity, / In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, / From ancient grudge brakes to new mutiny, / Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. / From forth the fatal lions of these foes / A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life; / Whose misadventured piteous overthrows / Doth with their death bury their parent's strife. / The fearful passage of their death-marked love, / And the continuance of their parent's rage, / Which, but their children's end, naught could remove…" -The Prologue, Romeo and Juliet (by William Shakespeare).

Fate plays a major role in the tragedy of Romeo and Juliet. The prologue describes Romeo's and Juliet's fate, which we see come up many times later on in the play. Throughout the
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Going back on the events, fate has played its role many times. The quarrel between Tybalt and Mercutio is the aftermath of Romeo's appearance at the Capulet's Ball. When Mercutio is slain by Tybalt, Romeo seeks revenge, and in term, slays Tybalt. The tragic cycle of events is leaving Romeo no choice but to flee Verona and live in the shadows until his name is forgotten and he is able to go back. Much is happening while he is gone, and in the midst of all the chaos, Juliet is in great depression, which brings us back to her talk with the Friar. Juliet's father is a large disappointment, and his practical view of Juliet's marriage consumes him and pushes his actions to extreme limits. He is so outraged at Juliet for not wanting to marry Parris, he holds himself no more and speaks his true thoughts.

Capulet. I tell thee what – get thee to Church on Thursday
Or never after look me in the face.
Speak not, reply not, do not answer me!
My fingers itch. Wife, we scarce though us blest
That God has lent us but this only child;
But now I see this one is one too much,
And that we have a curse in having her
Out on her, hilding!
(III, vi, lines 162-169)

Little does he know, that he is totally wrong. God ( representing fate), send Juliet to stop the ageless war. It is not "a curse in having her", but rather a blessing, which shall prove to be a tragic one indeed. The most fate driven event in the tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, must be the misunderstanding
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