Rugby Energy System

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It is of common knowledge that there proves to be a significant difference in what it takes physiologically speaking when comparing athletes of different sporting backgrounds to one another. Why is a marathon runner not as powerful as a rugby player or why can’t a 400m sprinter run a marathon? Simple, each athlete is more equipped to three different energy systems. As a sporting coach it is universal to have an understanding of the three main energy systems that underpins the study of exercise and the effect it has on the human body in regards to athletic performance. In order to recognize the role in which different energy systems play in athletic performance, an understanding will need to be gained. For this reasons this report is broken…show more content…
Analysing different training sessions from different sports: Throughout this section all three energy systems will be analysed in different sports and how they apply to sports performance. Rugby (ATP-PC): When looking at rugby and the average training program for this particular sport all three energy systems are heavily focused on. However, due to being such a powerful explosive sport the ATP-PC energy system is prominent throughout most positions on the field, therefore will be explored (Rodgers & Beesley, 1996). The ATP-PC system is an extremely valuable system and is favoured in rugby for high intensity efforts such as, shorts sprints and tackling. A well designed training program will allow a player to develop and maintain the many different fitness characteristics such as, endurance, agility and speed in which are all needed to play Rugby League. Methods used in training programs for speed and agility, using the ATP-PC energy system in rugby are as follow (Rodgers & Beesley,…show more content…
Rest: Walk recovery . 400m run (Glycolytic, Anaerobic): Throughout this section training program for 400m will be analysed. An example of a training program used to train the anaerobic energy system in 400m sprinter is, Table 1.1 Energy System Quality % effort Recovery Rep Distance Total distance Anaerobic Alactic (Phosphagen) Sp Power 95-100% >3 minutes 30m to 80m 200m to 400m SpE Capacity 85-95% >8 minutes 150m to 400m 400m to 800m Anaerobic Lactic (Glycolytic) SE1 Power 75-85% 1:4 active 100m to 300m 800m to 1600m SE2 Capacity 65-75% 1:2 active 400m to 700m 1600m to 3000m (Mackenzie, 2015) Shown in table 1.1 is a training program put in place to improve anaerobic energy system. The program is based on a six phases, each phase is based upon 4 week repeated training program, weeks 1 (easier), 2 (harder), 3 (hardest), and week 4 is a deload week with testing to monitor progress. The % effort determined in the programs are based upon 100% effort. The aim of the four week cycles is to build a higher anaerobic energy system (Mackenzie,
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