SCD Compliance

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Change is a hard concept for most, but change in the hospital setting can be beneficial for both staff and patients. According to Mclean (2011), “Every change begins with an ending” (p.79). How people respond to change can make the process easy or hard depending on how the change is presented.
Sequential Compression Devices (SCD’s) mechanically replace normal muscle motion in the leg via a cuff that inflates and deflates uniformly. This mechanical inflation and deflation keeps blood flowing in the veins and prevents the formation of clots that can result in deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism. SCD’s are used as prophylaxis in patient groups with low to moderate risk of DVT (Brady et al., 2007, p. 256). Patient compliance
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Studies to show which type of leg compression device is optimal for DVT prevention are not available. Knee-length SCD’s are more comfortable to patients, encourages higher levels of compliance and also provide beneficial prophylaxis against DVT.
An informal survey of perioperative nurses, physicians and patients was performed regarding the use of thigh-length versus knee-length SCD’s. The surgical services management team, clinical nurse educator, surgeons, and materials management were also involved in the process of using only knee-length SCD’s on all surgical patients. The surgeons, staff, and patients were perceptive and willing to use only knee-length SCD’s. The perioperative nurses were hesitant at times to call the physician for an order to place knee-length SCD’s on the surgical patient. This was a barrier to the suggested change project.
Havelock’s model of change will be used for this project. Perception of need, diagnosis of the problem, identification of the problem, devising a plan of action, gaining acceptance of the plan, stabilization, and self-renewal are all steps included in Havelock’s model of change (Kearney-Nunnery, 2012). Leadership is also an important part of the change process. In order to have a positive outcome, the leader must incorporate the staff in the change process.
Providing clarity about the change can improve the transition process. According to Mclean (2011), leaders
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