Santa Ana Winds Comparison Rhetorical Analysis

1079 Words Nov 12th, 2014 5 Pages
The Santa Ana Winds “ The Santa Ana” by Joan Didion and “Brush Fire” by Linda Thomas offer complete separate views to a similar topic, the winds of Southern California. In a first person narration the authors write of the wind from her own experience of living in California and from her own perspective, shedding light on two very different aspects of the Santa Ana winds.
Physically, both pieces of literature are different. Each story reflects its own writer as “The Santa Ana” has lengthy paragraphs, chock full of information. Didion is an American Author known for her literary journalism and use of logos. At a glance of the piece, it lists of reasonings and details is clearly visible. Each paragraph is filled with descriptions and
…show more content…
Didion personifies the wind as almost an unknown epidemic. Similar to when an unknown disease goes viral, all walks of life are affected. Didion clearly states how teachers, students, doctors, to physicists, to generally everyone becomes unhappy and uncomfortable during the winds. She does not write of how the wind caused fire to ravage the shrublands, but she writes of the symptoms it inflicts on the people. Didion mentions all the after effects of the wind and the harm it can do like inflict paranoia. She mentions how the fear-stricken victims of southern California are paranoid like her neighbor that refuses to leave the house and her husband who roams with a machete. Didion’s personification of the wind focuses on a fearful and distant light. In contrast, Thomas approaches the Santa Ana winds as a routinely destructive awe. Though Thomas focuses more on the fire caused by the wind, then the wind itself, Thomas casts a soft light on the winds. She believes that the winds are not destructive, but that humans are and the winds only do what they must. She and her neighbors gather around and watch the brushfire destroy a hill in the distance, a casual pastime like watching stars. Thomas casually explains in paragraph three of “Brush Fire”, “the burning of chaparral during these winds is normal”. She implies that the winds cause of destroying the Southern California land is natural, a simple part of nature. Thomas does not fear the winds like Didion, she admires the