Sarbanes Oxley : Corporate Responsibility For Financial Reports

760 Words Aug 23rd, 2015 4 Pages
Different portions of legislation have had an impact on corporations, accounting firms, and investors like Sarbanes-Oxley. Sarbanes-Oxley was passed by Congress in 2002 as a direct result of the accounting scandals that plagued the public equity markets during the late 1990s and early 2000s. Sarbanes-Oxley was developed to be a series of measures, safeguards, guidelines, and criminal punishments in order to prevent future accounting scandals on the scale of Enron and Worldcom. Sarbanes-Oxley has profoundly impacted both management and accountants although in mostly similar ways. The following exploration will compare and contrast these views held by management and accountants regarding Sarbanes-Oxley. According to Green (2004) Sarbanes-Oxley legislation is comprised of various sections, of which five are the most significant. These sections are Section 302, Section 401, Section 404, Section 409, and Section 802. Section 302 pertains to Corporate Responsibility for Financial Reports. This section requires the management of the issuing company to certify that the officers have reviewed the report, financial statements and accompanying notes and supplementary information are free from material misstatement. The financial statements and accompanying notes and supplementary information are free from material omissions, that management has evaluated internal controls within the previous 90 days and reported on their internal control findings. Any significant changes in internal…
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