Satire in the Importance of Being Ernest Essay

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Satire in The Importance of Being Ernest
Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest is truly a satire. In The Importance of Being Ernest, Wilde mocks the society in Britain, and the rules it followed in the 1800s. He uses satire in the description of every character and other themes like marriage, intelligence, morality, and lifestyle primarily aimed at the upper class of the time. At the turn of every page the use of satire proves again and again to be ideal when questioning the morals and values of people.
Wilde uses satire especially with the idea of marriage. In the society that he lived in, marriage is seen as a business arrangement. When Lady Bracknell questioned Jack to determine if he is suitable for her daughter, she
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He has a typical upper class Englishmen personality of the time in which satire was used many times. His extravagance, nonsense, irresponsibility are all qualities that make one laugh at his careless personality. He throws expensive parties, even though he is in a state of being in debt. As Lady Bracknell points out, “he has nothing but his debts to depend upon.” A great example of satire is when Jack tries to force Algernon to leave his estate.
Jack: Merriman, order the dog-cart at once. Mr. Ernest has been suddenly called back to town.
Merriman: Yes, sir.
Algernon: What a fearful liar you are, Jack. I have not been called back to town at all.
Jack: Yes, you have.
Algernon: I haven’t heard any one call me.
Jack: Your duty as a gentlemen calls you back.
Algernon: My duty as gentlemen has never interfered with my pleasures in the smallest degree.
Jack: I can quite understand that.

Satire is especially used to criticize people’s morals and outlooks on life. Algernon is very fashionable man, and is always overly dressed. This can be humorous but it also ridicules that type of picky lifestyle because young Englishmen of the time also worried too much about their clothes. As Lady Bracknell points out, Algernon “is nothing but he looks every thing”. According to Jack, Algernon is very prideful which is made clear from Algernon’s claim to being “immensely over-educated”. His view that relatives are “a tedious pack of
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