Saving the Postal Service: The Problems, the Solutions, and the "Surprise"

1461 WordsJul 17, 20186 Pages
At one point or another, we have all held and opened a piece of mail. Whether it was a birthday card, a letter from a friend, or even a bill, we have all held a piece of paper that was sent from somewhere else. Even in the age of Facebook and email, it is likely that you have held a piece of mail and most likely, the way it got from point A (the person sending the mail) to point B (the person receiving the mail) was through the United States Postal Service, or the USPS. In the past decade, the postal service has experienced a decreased volume in their letter mail. In fact, for the postal service, the volume of this letter mail has been "falling at a rate not seen since the Great Depression" and it is believed to be because the…show more content…
Even though one or two cents may not seem like a lot in the short run, it all adds up. Although it might seem like an easier solution, the postal service still has regulations when it comes to the rise in stamp prices. They are unable to raise them by themselves and instead need it to be "approved by the independent Postal Regulatory Commission" (Postal Service). It is a Federal law that the postal service cannot raise the price of stamps without this approval. This shows that they are really like the teenager declaring that they will take out the car when the parents (or Congress) are holding the keys, as Peter Rorvig describes in his blog post. Even though the postal service is a privatized business and they have to self advertise, they continue to be held back like a dog on a leash. Speaking of Peter Rorvig's saying about the postal service being like the teenager that is determined to take out the car even though the parents (or Congress) holds all the power, the main point of this blog post talks about how Congress will not let the USPS do five- day delivery. It is said that if the postal service were to cut Saturday delivery, they would save around $2 billion per year. Even though the postal service announced, in an act of independence, on February 6, 2013 that they would be cutting Saturday delivery "to homes and businesses beginning
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