Essay on Segregation in Education in the USA

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In 1950, America had come out of World War Two and was once again one of the richest and strongest nations but there still was a group of people who didn’t have the freedom and the equal rights that most Americans had. This group of people had been slaves for the American people until 1865 and had always faced discrimination and violence despite there help in the war effort. The blacks of America had a dream that things would soon change for them and that they would have the same opportunities and the same rights that the white Americans had but this seemed an impossible dream due to segregation, the “separate but equal” rule in which white and black people of America were separated in …show more content…
The first people to try and challenge the education board were the parents of a young girl called Linda Brown. They believed that the fact their daughter had to travel five miles to school everyday because she was not allowed to attended the white school across the block made the “separate but equal” rule unequal and finally decided to sue. On May the 17th 1954, the Supreme Court declared, "segregated schools are not equal and cannot be made equal, and hence they are deprived of the equal protection of the laws", due to Thurgood Marshall, director of the NAACP's Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Brown V’s board of education helped change America forever. The blacks didn’t get desegregation that easily though and it became a major problem for them. There was lots of resistance in the south and one of the main reasons for this were the politicians as they started to act dictatorially. Whites stared to realise that if they could start become violent at schools then they had a reason to say no to them desegregating schools. Whites were afraid that blacks would advance socially and economically challenging white supremacy and that integration would lead to a “mongrel race” of people. If there was going to be violence between the whites and blacks wasn’t it better to keep them apart? Whites were afraid that blacks would gain supremacy in the south if they were to