Seizing the Day in Robert Herrick’s poem, “To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time” and Andrew Marvel’s “To His Coy Mistress”

1360 WordsFeb 19, 20185 Pages
To what extent may an argument be framed as believable or serious? Persuasion on seizing the day is a common theme in Robert Herrick’s poem, “To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time” and Andrew Marvel’s “To His Coy Mistress”. The arguments within the poems can seem unrealistic, a little hyperbolic, with an underlying intent to acquire a woman to sleep with them. The concrete position of all the arguments within the two poems seems to be, getting a woman to sleep with them. The two poets posses similarities between the two pieces of poetry, however argue the topics in different ways. Beauty is not forever lasting, coyness put aside, while pleasure embraced, and time is of the essence; are all points made to intrigue women to be with them. To focus on those points a little: The beauty of a woman is compared to aspects of nature. Herrick’s poem only looks at the physical qualities of a woman, unlike Marvel’s, which references personality along with physical traits. Sexual passion embraced, and coyness set aside? The poets, both urge women to act upon sexual urges while they stay youthful, but if a woman was told they are not going to be desired when older, would they actually want to be with someone who tells them that? Time is moving quickly and its made known within the poems. Herrick is an advocate to relate everything to physical aspects, so of course he says a woman’s beauty diminishes quickly. Marvel does not relate beauty and time together, instead he would

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