Select Two “Employee Voice” Practices, One an Example of Representative Participation and the Second an Example of Direct Employee Involvement, and Assess the Strengths and Weaknesses of Each in Terms of Their Value to the Employee.

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Introduction Employee voice is an umbrella term used to capture the many forms of practice that give employees a view at work. These processes and structures enable, and at times empower, employees directly and indirectly to contribute to decision making in the business. This report will look into two forms of employee voice; employee representative participation and direct employee involvement, it will look at a specific practice of each form of employee voice and analyse the strengths and weaknesses on their value to the employee. Representative Participation In 1996 a European Works Council was made a mandatory feature of any organisation with over 1000 employees that operate in over 2 EU states (EUGOV, 1996). In the UK…show more content…
With an established works council employees can give work place issues a larger voice by bringing their concerns to the attention of the employer through the council. The existence of a works council also gives employees the right to be informed, consulted, to independent investigation and the right to co-determination. This again signifies the level of power and influence the employees have available at the use of a works council as they are very much involved in the decision making. Weaknesses of Works Council for employees One of the more common weaknesses of a works council is employee scepticism. As an employee they might feel that although the works council is there is represent them, the decisions are still truly in the hands of management and the whole idea is not a true reflection of their interests. The adoption of inappropriate systems in the work place in order to be represented by the council may arise. If the employees are required to fill in large amounts of paper work in order to bring an issue to the council’s attention then they probably won’t bother, it could be seen as a waste of their time. Interest in participation ‘ebbs and flows’ at both the micro and macro levels (Marchington, 1992) highlights the common lack of continuity with a work council. Conclusion Overall the presence of a works council in the business does have various strengths of significant value to the employee. The depth

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