Self-discovery in Toni Bambora´s The Lesson and Liliana Heker´s The Stolen Party

679 Words 3 Pages
The diverse and powerful topic of socioeconomic can be explored to develop characters and the overall theme of a story. Two literary stories in particular, “The Lesson” by Toni Bambara and “The Stolen Party” by Liliana Heker, have used socioeconomic status to create a second theme of self-discovery. The main characters in each of these two stories are young girls who discover their adult selves by the end. A low socioeconomic status was a part of each character’s character development in “The Lesson” and “The Stolen Party”, which ultimately forced them down a path of self-discovery. Good Start In both of these literary works, the low socioeconomic status of the main characters is made well known to the reader early on. This status is …show more content…
The diverse and powerful topic of socioeconomic can be explored to develop characters and the overall theme of a story. Two literary stories in particular, “The Lesson” by Toni Bambara and “The Stolen Party” by Liliana Heker, have used socioeconomic status to create a second theme of self-discovery. The main characters in each of these two stories are young girls who discover their adult selves by the end. A low socioeconomic status was a part of each character’s character development in “The Lesson” and “The Stolen Party”, which ultimately forced them down a path of self-discovery. Good Start In both of these literary works, the low socioeconomic status of the main characters is made well known to the reader early on. This status is not a small detail to be known about the girls; rather it is an essential part of them. Knowing that these girls are not financially well-off is the most important development in their character and the overall message the stories send. In sociology, there is a term called master status, meaning, “a status that has exceptional importance for social identity, often shaping a person's entire life” (Marshall). In the case of these two stories, the low socioeconomic statuses act as master statuses for the girls; more important that their gender, or roles as daughters, or students. “The Lesson” is told in the first-person point of view by a young African-American girl named Sylvia living in the ghettos of New York City. She tells a story about a