Semester A Unit 3 Lesson 6

1004 WordsMay 4, 20155 Pages
Semester A Unit 3 Lesson 6 Introduction and Objective Do you ever make a guess about something? Have you ever read a title of a text and took what you know along with what it says and guess what it will be about? Author write in a way that you can make inferences and make generalizations. Today 's lesson objective is: students will be able to use evidence from a text to determine what inferences or generalizations can be made from the text. Think about the objective above. What learning skills can you use to succeed in this lesson? Perhaps you will make a list of details and analyze them for their impact on the central idea. Maybe you will classify the information you find into categories. Open your digital notebook and describe…show more content…
Opinions can also change. For example: This week you might like pizza, then next week you may not. When you make an inference, you should support it with evidence that are facts not opinions. When you state an opinion, you are stating what you think. Be sure to support your opinion with facts to make it valid. Read the first paragraph of section 1, chapter 3, “Creating Dalhart.” An inference that can be made is: Bam White will continue to work hard. The evidence is throughout the paragraph, but obvious in the final line: “White’s gut told him this town was going somewhere.” An opinion that may be stated about the paragraph is: Bam White is a hard worker. The evidence includes: him getting his family to this point; working as a sharecropper; time spent selling root vegetables; time spent looking for better work. ELA6_A_3_6_ACT_1 It is important to cite evidence. The best form of evidence is Explicit Textual Evidence which means it is direct, from the text and it supports your answer. Citing with this type of evidence to support any idea you may come up with about a text allows the reader to trust what you are stating. If can back up an opinion about a text with explicit textual evidence, then you will be taken more seriously than if you gave a “just because” reason. Referring to the final paragraph in section 1, chapter 5, “Last of the Great Plains,” of The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of
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