Sex Education And Sexual Education

915 Words4 Pages
How can sexual education programs be improved to further improve the health of a country? INTRODUCTION Sex education has become increasingly normalised in the twenty-first century. Attitudes to sex have evolved as society becomes more open to discussions about relationships and sexual health. Simultaneously, the rate of teen pregnancy has dropped since the previous generation, suggesting that either teenagers are having sex later, or using contraception more effectively. As sex education is prevalent, however not compulsory in many of today’s high schools, the country must question the value of this program – and the impacts on the students who undertake it. The sexual health of an individual is intrinsically connected to the overall physical and mental health of the country. The health of individuals makes up the health of a population – it seems quite clear that, in a perfect world, sexual education would improve national health. Countries around the world have different attitudes towards sex education, and opinions on the most effective way to teach it – and the overall health of these populations is equally as diverse. Australia as a nation must investigate the effects of sexual education, to ensure its program is the most effective. COMPARE DIFFERENT TACTICS ROUND THE WORLD European countries have the lowest rates of teen pregnancies, with fewer than four births per thousand. These countries include Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Italy. These countries’
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