Sexism in Advertising Essay

791 Words4 Pages
Ciera Colley
M. Conklin
ENC 1102-058
27 September 2011
Project 1: Ad Analysis

It is obvious that women and men have play different roles in advertising. Men are portrayed as the dominant figure, while women are portrayed weak or as objects. For example, in this ad the male figure is taller and his face doesn’t have as much lighting as the female figure. Appearing in 1961, a time remembered by family values and consumerism, this ad for a Kenwood Chef food processor uses the stereotype of women being at the disposal of men. The audience is singled out through the text in the ad itself, which reads “I’m giving my wife a Kenwood Chef.” As men working was the main source of income for the average family in the 60s, the obvious
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The logical fallacy, hasty generalization, is one that “usually lies behind a stereotype.” The author of this ad uses the 1960s society stereotype that women shouldn’t work, rather they should stay home and care for their family. Thinking back to the time period, this ad was probably a perfect advertising tactic. It goes well with the wanting of having a stable home and family during the time. The wife cooking and cleaning at home and the husband out working, so that he may buy his wife a Kenwood Chef. The feeling of the ad is a light, casual, humor or general happiness. Most of this feeling is coming from the female figure, as if she’s just received the Kenwood Chef as a gift from her husband. The author tries to convey to the husband how much happier his wife will be to cook for the family if she had the appliance. In conclusion, men and women play different roles in advertising. Men are portrayed as the dominant figure, while women are portrayed weak or as objects. This ad has a strong appeal to the rhetorical appeals, kairos and pathos. Also, logical fallacy, hasty generalization, is quite present. The timing of the ad was during a time of family values and consumerism, so it made sense to have the male as the dominant figure.

Works Cited
Brasted, Monica. "Care Bears vs. Transformers: Gender Stereotypes in Advertisements - The

Socjournal." The Socjournal. 7 Feb. 2010. Web. 27 Sept.
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