Shelley as a Lyricist

1486 Words Aug 9th, 2010 6 Pages
P.B. Shelley (1792-1822) as a Lyricist.
It can be said without any reserve that the genius of English poetry is best manifested in the great Romantic Lyricism of the 18th Century. The Lyricism became spectacular in the Odes, Sonnets, and elegies of Wordsworth, Shelley, Coleridge, Byron and Keats. The Lyricism of these great Romantic poets is generally deemed unsurpassable either by their illustrious predecessors or by their subsequent meritorious successors. Romantic poetry is basically Lyrical even when its theme is philosophic, didactic or secular love. A Lyric is a short poem, usually divided into stanzas and directly expressing in melodious language the thoughts, emotions and feelings of the poet himself… It is the crowning
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There is more symmetry and simplicity of form as well as theme in the closing Chorus. But the music has the same clearness, the same swift yet stately movement: A Loftier Argo cleaves the main Fraught with a richer prize Another Orpheus sings again And loves, and weeps and dies. A new Ulysses Leaves once more Calypso for his native shore.
Almost all the modes of songs, from the simplest to the most intricate, are to be found in this poetic epic. This Lyrical strain is present in almost all his longer poems---Prince Athanase, The Witch of Atlas, Rosalind and Helen, Adonais, Alastar, Epipsychidion, and the Triumph of Life----but it is in his smaller poems where his greatest virtue as a Lyricist lies. The following poems may be referred in this regard :
The Constantia Singing, Ozymandias of Egypt, The Lines written among the Eugene Hills, Stanzas written in Dejection, Ode to the west wind, The Cloud, The Skylark ,Arethusa , World’s Wonderers, Music when soft voices die, The Flowers that smiles to-day; Rarely, Rarely, comes thou; The Lament, One word is too often profaned, The Indian Air, The Second Lament; O world! O Life! O time; Invitation; Recollection etc.
Between 1819 and 1820 he

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