Should College Athletes Be Paid? Essay

2109 Words 9 Pages
Cameron Newton was a coveted recruit coming out of Georgia’s Westlake High School in 2007. Upon signing with the University of Florida, he earned a back-up spot behind Tim Tebow, the 2007 Heisman Trophy winner. After being arrested on felony charges, Newton dropped out of Florida and enrolled at Blinn Junior College in Texas. Newton led his team to the 2009 NJCAA National Football Championship, after which he was the only 5-star recruit for the 2010 season, as stated on rivals.com. His top two choices for college: Mississippi State University and Auburn University. After his first year at Blinn Junior College he committed to Auburn. During the 2010 football season, Newton led the #1 ranked Tigers to a national championship berth with an …show more content…
Major contenders like Texas, Alabama, or Michigan make millions of dollars off their college athletes. CNNMoney.com reports that The University of Texas football program brings in 68 million dollars profit each year, along with The University of Michigan, which brings in 44 million dollars each year. With revenues like this many sports enthusiasts argue that athletes should receive a cut in the money. Most programs, however, are not making as much as these big programs. The NCAA reports that of bowl-eligible schools, fifty-three schools split $26 million dollars. The NCAA also reports that within those fifty-three schools, eight of the schools lost money.
Those who are not in favor of college athletes being compensated, claim that schools that are losing money make up for those who make money. An NCAA report claimed that the fifty-two of the FBS (football sub division) schools reported loss from their football program. On average those schools lost around 2.7 million dollars. With this being said, many against paying athletes claim it to be improbable to pay athletes. Schools in major conferences such as the Big Ten, SEC, and Big 12 report earnings from their football program. On the opposite side are teams in small…