Significance of the Nazi Soviet Non Aggression Pact

1124 WordsJul 15, 20135 Pages
The Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact was extremely significant in regards to the outbreak of war in Europe in 1939, however there were several other factors that also led to the outbreak of WWII. These factors include; the allied policy of appeasement, the failure the League of Nations and Collective Security and the aggressive nature of Nazi and Italian foreign policy. The signing of the 1939 Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact was extremely significant in regards to the outbreak of war in Europe. Both Germany and Russia possessed considerable motives for signing the pact. From the time of ‘Mein Kampf’ Hitler had outwardly expressed his desire to move toward Russia in his quest for ‘Lebensraum,’ however in 1939, it was beneficial for him…show more content…
As it was built on the unrealistic premise that nations would overlook their own interests in order to look after other members, the League of Nations and Collective Security was destined to fail. Nations were required to turn over their right to make decisions and foreign policies over to an international body so as to establish ‘internationalism.’ The requirements of the league are described by historian E.H Carr as being, overly optimistic, ‘hollow and without substance.’ The invasion of Abyssinia by Mussolini was the embodiment of the failure of Collective Security. Upon hearing of Mussolini’s intent to invade the smaller country, Britain and France decided to refrain from intervening as they hoped to make an ally of Italy and did not want Mussolini to break the Stresa Front and side with Hitler. Of course Italy did side with Hitler and through their idleness, set a precedent of inaction that encouraged Hitler and the axis powers to act. Similar examples of the failure of the League can also be seen in its response to Italy and Germany’s involvement in the Spanish Civil War and Japan’s invasion of Manchuria. Much like the policy of appeasement, the failure of the League of Nations gave the axis powers the idea that little to no action would be taken
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