Silent Spring Essay

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Silent Spring

Rachel Louise Carson (1907-64), was an American marine biologist, and author of widely read books on ecological themes. Carson was born in Springdale, Pennsylvania, and educated at the former Pennsylvania College for Women and Johns Hopkins University. Rachel Carson taught Zoology at the University of Maryland from 1931 to 1936. She was an aquatic biologist at the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries and its successor, the Fish and Wildlife Service, from 1936 to 1952. Rachel Carson wrote 4 books including The Sea Around Us for which she was awarded the 1952 National Book Award for nonfiction. At the end of Rachel Carson's career she wrote Silent Spring, which questioned the use of Chemical Pesticides and was responsible for arousing
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The over use of DDT, dieldrin and other pesticides eventually poisoned an entire world of living things. Silent Spring not only recognizes the severity of the chemicals usage but recognizes the effect of substance use on a community. It helped people to look at the whole picture, to look into the future instead of the now. Carson helps to change this way of thinking by offering solutions to the existing problems. She helps to show that nature will take care of nature. Many times the best solutions are the introduction of other plants or animals. For many thousands of years man has been battling nature, when if he took a step back, he would see that if he just worked with it his problems could be solved. Rachel Carson helped many people to see this ideal and is partly responsible for starting the environmental movement that has become so apparent in today's society. There are many people that do not support Rachel Carson's findings about DDT. These people challenge her experiments and say that the results would have been worse had the controls not been manipulated. The direct effect of DDT may be different on all types of animals. What the people fail to notice that challenge her statements are the chemical bonds that are produced with DDT and other chemical substances. The significance of Rachel Carson's book was not the scientific accuracy but instead the position it took on DDT. Why this book is so recognized has nothing to do with the actual