Similarities Involving Social Ritual and Ceremony in The Hunger Games and The Lottery

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By using arbitrary rules, inequitable odds, and blindly following traditions in The Hunger Games and “The Lottery” Collins and Jackson create an environment for a hostile social ritual and ceremony. In society rules are made so no one gets hurt and so that there is a standard of living we can all abide by; however, in The Hunger Games and “The Lottery” the rules are set to do the opposite. The rules made by “the game makers” are in place to cause chaos, death, and fear among the citizens in both stories. A rule of significance in each story is that everyone must be present for the “reaping.” Although each story has different reasons as to why everyone must be present the consequences are implied to be the same. In The Hunger Games the…show more content…
In both cases if you miss the “reaping” or the lottery the odds of you being chosen are put in someone else’s hand which unfortunately for the main characters in both stories, are not in their favor. The odds of being chosen in both stories seem to be equal but when the reader peels back the silver lining that the game creators want you to believe they are far from fair. In The Hunger Games the Capitol offers a meager parcel of food and water that lasts for one year per person which is called a tesserae. Starting at the age of twelve a child can take out one tesserae per person in their family given that they agree to have their name entered in the draw, once per tesserae, for the hunger games to be a tribute. This targets poorer people in each district because wealthier people, such as the mayor’s daughter, only have their name entered in the jar once per year while someone like Katness Everdeen has their name entered twenty times by the age of sixteen. In “The Lottery” the odds of being chosen decrease as your family size increases. During the first draw the odds are even among head of households but once the household has been chosen the odds of being chosen differ. For example, if a family that had three members pulled out the black dot first then each member has two out of three chances of surviving where as if a family that consisted of twelve members pulled out the

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