Similarities and Differences Between Ancient Greek and Byzantine Art

1670 Words 7 Pages
Part A: Plan of Investigation Artists created their own unique style in Greek culture and with the creation of the Roman Empire, Greek artwork had been spread throughout the region. When the empire eventually split and faded from existence, Greek artwork had left its mark on the remaining civilizations. Because Byzantium had arisen from the ashes of the Roman Empire, Byzantine artwork incorporated aspects of Greek art within their own artwork. The purpose of this investigation is to compare and contrast art in ancient Greece and Byzantium. Recognizing the similarities and differences between two related cultures is vital in understanding the evolution of art from one culture to another. Within this investigation designs/patterns and …show more content…
Part A: Plan of Investigation Artists created their own unique style in Greek culture and with the creation of the Roman Empire, Greek artwork had been spread throughout the region. When the empire eventually split and faded from existence, Greek artwork had left its mark on the remaining civilizations. Because Byzantium had arisen from the ashes of the Roman Empire, Byzantine artwork incorporated aspects of Greek art within their own artwork. The purpose of this investigation is to compare and contrast art in ancient Greece and Byzantium. Recognizing the similarities and differences between two related cultures is vital in understanding the evolution of art from one culture to another. Within this investigation designs/patterns and symbols will be researched in the Greek Classical Period (ca. 480-323 BCE) and the Byzantine Golden Age (ca. 850-1050 BC). Artwork within the cities of Athens, Constantinople and others will be examined, examinations and conclusions determined by the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be inspected and online and print sources will be studied as well.

Part B: Summary of Evidence
Art in Greece’s Classical Period
Attic Vase Painting Attic Vase painting was a popular style between the sixth and the end of the fourth centuries BCE and the technique itself was first used by Athenian potters. Usually the necks and bodies were created first (on a wheel) and then the handles were added later. In black-figure vase painting, designs were painted